Draft Urban Forest Strategy 2018-2023

Consultation has concluded

Do you have an interest in the green spaces, trees and other vegetation in the City? If so, we would like to hear from you!

The City has developed a draft Urban Forest Strategy for the years 2018-2023 in response to the priorities set in the Strategic Community Plan, Nedlands 2028 identifying the issues facing these areas in the future. The purpose of the strategy is to respond to changing weather patterns, water shortages, ground water availability, reducing tree canopy and the quality of infrastructure to support this environment.

The strategy primarily addresses public land and only monitors the condition of trees on private land. It provides guidance on ensuring that the City can achieve the tree canopy cover target which will result in increased shade to reduce the surface temperature and achieve increased social, environmental and economic benefits that enrich the quality of our City.


How can you get involved, find out more or provide feedback?

To participate, please register by clicking on the 'Register to get involved' tab at the top of this page. Once you have registered, please visit the document library, read the strategy document.

  • The engagement activities have closed for this project, however you can still ask questions of the City by using the question tool and we will respond.
Please note that all feedback is assessed regardless of the tool that is used. It is advisable to provide your feedback using the tool that best suits your needs. Multiple submissions by an individual is assessed as one submission. All feedback received via email and by letter will also be placed on this engagement page.

Feedback and updates will occur by the News Feed on this engagement page.


Do you have an interest in the green spaces, trees and other vegetation in the City? If so, we would like to hear from you!

The City has developed a draft Urban Forest Strategy for the years 2018-2023 in response to the priorities set in the Strategic Community Plan, Nedlands 2028 identifying the issues facing these areas in the future. The purpose of the strategy is to respond to changing weather patterns, water shortages, ground water availability, reducing tree canopy and the quality of infrastructure to support this environment.

The strategy primarily addresses public land and only monitors the condition of trees on private land. It provides guidance on ensuring that the City can achieve the tree canopy cover target which will result in increased shade to reduce the surface temperature and achieve increased social, environmental and economic benefits that enrich the quality of our City.


How can you get involved, find out more or provide feedback?

To participate, please register by clicking on the 'Register to get involved' tab at the top of this page. Once you have registered, please visit the document library, read the strategy document.

  • The engagement activities have closed for this project, however you can still ask questions of the City by using the question tool and we will respond.
Please note that all feedback is assessed regardless of the tool that is used. It is advisable to provide your feedback using the tool that best suits your needs. Multiple submissions by an individual is assessed as one submission. All feedback received via email and by letter will also be placed on this engagement page.

Feedback and updates will occur by the News Feed on this engagement page.


Do you have any general feedback about the Urban Forest Strategy? If so, please provide it here. If your feedback relates to the Vision or the goals, objectives and actions please provide your comments on the forum.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

It's good to have an urban forest strategy, but can we please have a Swan River plain urban forest rather than an English village urban forest? I look out my window at a street full of English deciduous trees, and at the pocket park up the road littered with poplars and one loan peppermint.

Nedlands has been quite good at planting banksias in some places, which are a vital source of food for our endangered Carnaby's and Red Tails, as well as a haven for our bush birds. The strategy is silent on what kinds of trees will be planted. I would like to see a street tree and park planting list and feel quite strongly that planes, poplars , liquid amber and chinese tallow are completely inappropriate for our climate and urban setting. Not only do leaves the size of dinner plates block our drainage system, they do little to support our native wild life. The trees we should plant are the ones we have displaced. There is an argument that Tuarts are inappropriate for urban areas. They are perfectly fine if managed properly and planting these trees now ( hollow makers) is the only way we are going to effectively conserve our native birdlife (so long as we can rid ourselves of the imported feral rainbow lorikeets to make space for the natives). And don't gt me started on the ubiquitous Queensland Box....some years ago Nedlands had a street tree strategy proposal which suggested removing and replacieng these. What happened??

Another strategy worth considering is seeking offsets from developers. I watched the infill up near Montgomery venue and Stephenson Avenue with despair. All the natives razed. An infill program where the developers offset their destruction with planting in some of our less than useful pocket parks, at a minimum would assist in offsetting this destruction.

Speaking of pocket parks, the strategy mentions these in passing. They are a left over from a somewhat discredited design guideline and are generally under-utilised spaces which could, in some instances, be used as community gardens, especially in subdivisions where land area is around 330 sq m and there's no room for a vegetable garden. While a community garden might not immediately align with an Urban forest strategy, they are part and parcel of parks management.

Jang53 about 1 year ago

Agree with the idea of increasing the number of trees in the area, disagree with the idea of removing dead trees since these provide an important habitat for insect and bird life. An integrated approach to tree growth and the role of trees in the wider ecosystem is needed. Will the strategy include stopping residents from removing large trees on their property? Often seems to happen in our area that when an old house is knocked down the block is blitzed and old tree growth allowed to be removed to make way for a huge house and concreted block. Having 'corridors' of native flora for native fauna is important. Melbourne is pioneering this concept in an urban setting. Check it out.

SB about 1 year ago