Carrington Park - Enviro-scape Master Plan

Consultation has concluded

The City is now progressing with the implementation of the enviro-scape master plan as a result of the community engagement activities undertaken.

The strategic vision developed takes into account the park’s future use and development, alignment to current service levels and budgets. Issues addressed included the natural and built environment, water quality and conservation, climate change, along with accessibility, amenity, community use and ensuring the park is fit for purpose.

In developing the plan, the City identified and researched a range of topics, possible constraints, opportunities and issues relevant to Carrington Park.

The enviro-scape master plan aims to ensure community needs are met in the most economical way possible for the Park’s lifespan.

The City is now progressing with the implementation of the enviro-scape master plan as a result of the community engagement activities undertaken.

The strategic vision developed takes into account the park’s future use and development, alignment to current service levels and budgets. Issues addressed included the natural and built environment, water quality and conservation, climate change, along with accessibility, amenity, community use and ensuring the park is fit for purpose.

In developing the plan, the City identified and researched a range of topics, possible constraints, opportunities and issues relevant to Carrington Park.

The enviro-scape master plan aims to ensure community needs are met in the most economical way possible for the Park’s lifespan.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Do you have a question for the City in relation to this project?  If so, please ask us here and we will respond.

  • Option 3: I have a small dog and we walk from one side of the park to the other off the leash. There is never a problem with this, however, if she can exit to Weld St without a barrier, she would do so. Anyone who has a dog knows that having a dog on a leash in a park with other dogs off the leash is a recipe for disaster. Also having open access would allow a dog to run straight into the park and potentially attack another dog or a small child. So, does "access to park from Weld Street permanently open" mean that there is no barrier into and out of the park? Can you please just give me a "Yes" or "No" answer.

    K Asked almost 3 years ago

    Option 3 has no barrier preventing a dog off the leash running out of the park, therefore the answer is yes.

  • Options 2 and 3 are essentially the same - just one with an open dog entrance the other not. Will the total votes for these two categories be added together against Option 1 or are the options being diluted to ensure that those favouring Option 1 can get it across the line without too much opposition? It would make sense to have Options 2+3 added together against Option 1, and then if they win the vote, then which ever option out of 2 and 3 with the most votes be given the first place spot. Some clarification would be greatly appreciated. Many thanks.

    Broome St Resident Asked almost 3 years ago

    Option 3 has no barrier preventing a dog off the leash running out of the park, therefore the answer is yes.

    The difference between option 2 and 3 is that option 3 has an open end to Weld Street and option 2 does not.

    The City will report the support for the two options separately, that is, the support for the two options will not be added together as there is a significant operational difference between them.

  • Option 3 What exactly do you mean by access to park from Weld Street permanently open? Does that mean that dogs and children can wonder in and out of the park, onto the road as they please? Please explain

    Melita Asked almost 3 years ago

    Thank you for your question. The City received a number of submissions regarding lack of control of some dogs by owners. The open end in option 3 would ensure that those owners who did not control or trust their dog would keep them on a leash.

  • Re the 3 options presented in the current community engagement: 1) Will the basket ball court be separately fenced off from the playground? Currently playground users are mostly toddlers. Current basket ball court users are mostly teenage boys and men. Two incompatible groups when basketballs start flying around. 2) Options 2 and 3 seek to incorporate almost all the shady areas (near to the Broome St end of the park) into the playground area meaning the dog park will have limited natural shade. Many dog owners spend 30-60 minutes at the park each day so having shaded areas is vital. 3) All Fencing and Gate options must ensure the dog area is fully enclosed. Quite a few visitors to the dog park are elderly. If they are not confident their dog is contained in the park it will decrease their willingness to bring their dog to the park. The park serves as dog socialisation but also a vital social outlet for older residents, especially men who congregate in the morning and afternoon to chat.

    Sarah Bentley Asked almost 3 years ago

    Thank you for your question and comments. The basketball court will be fenced on two sides, the road side behind the basketball tower and the playground side to ensure the basketball does not impact on the road or the playground.

  • Thanks for the opportunity to vote on the 3 suggested options. I am concerned that Option 3 proposes a permanently open gate at Weld Street! How will dogs be contained in the park?? Surely this is a serious safety hazard if dogs are able to escape at their will... I don't understand the benefit of this and can't find any explanation anywhere.

    emmaheff Asked almost 3 years ago

    Thank you for your question.

    The City received a number of submissions regarding lack of control of some dogs by owners. The open end in option 3 would ensure that those owners who did not control or trust their dog would keep them on a leash.

  • Having looked at the new options, I would like to know why the sandpit has been kept in the plans (even if it is smaller), as no-one is in favour of it. It will be a health hazard for both children and dogs (eg. syringes, cans, bottles, condoms, cats and dogs urinating in it). These items have all previously been found at the park and have been disposed of by the dog owners. Can you please reconsider putting a sandpit in the park?

    Falconer Asked almost 3 years ago

    Thank you for your question.

    The sandpit is recognised as a popular facility for dogs. Its location has been designed to coincide with the area where the dog owners throw the ball as they enter the park, that is where the park is continually excavated by the dogs.

    It will be managed in the same way as all other sand softfall throughout the City, that is, raked regularly and sand replenished as necessary.

  • I have responded to the Survey but could not put in Final comment-- no space. The WaterCorp makes recycled water freely available for Community Parks /Playing fields--50 such sites already in WA.If water shortage is becoming a problem why not consider some project with the Water Corp to use properly treated recycled water to irrigate Carrington St. Park?

    BConnor Asked about 3 years ago

    Thank you for your question. Unfortunately the Water Corporation does not provide recycled water freely to local government. The City is only aware of one trial in the western suburbs at McGillvray Oval which commenced in 2004. There have been no further trials or projects that the City is aware of in the western suburbs since this time.


  • If the Council acknowledged previously that Carrington Park was popular with dog owners why did it not determine the factors contributing to its popularity (perhaps through a survey of local dog owners who use the park) and replicate these elsewhere in Nedlands to reduce the pressure on the park. For example, if seating and shade is a draw card perhaps more seating and the planting of shady trees could have been added to Asquith Park in Mt Claremont, which is also a fenced park but has no play equipment. Can Council please advise if it has ever surveyed local dog owners who use Carrington on what they want in a dog park, and how they get to the park (walk or drive)? Can Council also advise whether it has, or ever had, any plans to provide such amenities in Asquith Park to reduce the impact on Carrington? This would seem a potential solution as opposed to fencing part of the foreshore which it is understood was an option several years ago but knocked back by Council.

    cmlacy Asked about 3 years ago

    Please see newsfeed

  • Thanks for taking the time to provide a response and some background. I appreciate the time taken to provide an answer, unfortunately it didn't answer any of my questions. Can I ask the same questions again and ask for a response to address my questions? 1. If there was never a legal requirement to take the decision to fence off Carrington Park to a council meeting, why did a decision to take the same action in an area south of Stirling Highway have to go to a council meeting? 2. Has any consideration been given to providing safe active recreation in Carrington Park to pre-tweens and teenagers? 3.How do the current plans for Carrington Park fit in with a strategic plan to address the lack of public parks in the local area? And I would like to add one more question: 4: "there was never a conscious intention to make the park a fenced dog park". If that is the case, then why is the plan put to local ratepayers all about creating safe, separated spaces for dogs and not a single mention of allowing local kids and families to safely use the park?

    RichardA Asked about 3 years ago

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  • I am interested to learn what evidence and data the Council has used to base its decision that Carrington Park, a local park, should be formally developed into a fenced dog park through the initiatives proposed in this Masterplan. Numerous social media sites promote this park as one of Perth's top ten fenced dog parks. With Council's Local Planning Strategy acknowledging the lack of public open space in this area one wonders why the little that exists should be used to provide a service beyond locals. When I joined a friend to visit the park a business owner showed up with 8 dogs and promptly handed his card to my friend advertising his dog sitting business. Councils such as Stirling and Cockburn are now developing strategies and setting criteria for fenced dog parks given their growing popularity including prescribing a minimum size and requiring they be located away from houses. Has Nedlands considered setting such criteria?

    cmlacy Asked about 3 years ago

    Please see newsfeed